Welding aluminium

Discussion in 'Observed Trials Discussion' started by ross128, Aug 19, 2004.

  1. ross128

    ross128 Guest

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    well, can different kinds of aluminium be welded togeather, i mean like for instance 2024 and 6063? both t6 temper? tanner? well, thanks
     
  2. Ed Gildea

    Ed Gildea New Member

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    yeah but it will be super shitty. like a big turd for a bead.
     

  3. ross128

    ross128 Guest

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    what about 6063 t5 and 6063 t6 alu?
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2004
  4. jmkimmel

    jmkimmel Active Member

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    Either way, you'll have to re-heat treat the whole thing anyway.
     
  5. AndyT

    AndyT New Member

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  6. atypical

    atypical Guest

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    A while back I had a guy weld some aluminum for me. 1st I bolted the parts together then he used a MIG system and it held up fine- it was the dropouts on a street bike, and basically the weld was meant to make it look seamless and not TOO much for withstanding major forces.

    A framemaker would tell you not to do it, I would do it but reinforce it if possible.
     
  7. aka Mr Floyd

    aka Mr Floyd New Member

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    What the hell are you talking about?

    You can weld different aluminums together. The weld bead is going to look as good as the experience of the welder can make it look. Heat treatments and hardening of aluminum doesn't really matter when you weld it because the temp created by the welding basically undoes all that when it melts the metal locally. This is why sometimes welded areas become weaker as the grade of the aluminum drops in an area around the weld. This is why when big manufacturers make frames they weld up all the aluminum and then heat treat and temper the whole frame at the same time so it is all of a consistent material property (including the welds).

    So, if it's an area that doesn't take much stress, weld it and don't worry about it. If it's an area that does take alot of stress, you can still weld it but you will probably want to weld on reinforcing gussets as well to distribute the stresses on the now less strong aluminum over a wider area to reduce any chance of cracking.

    Ow, now my brain hurts from actually using my engineering degree... I'm going to go back to looking at teeth now.

    Todd

    P.S.
    atypical, I wish I had Dr. Teeth as my avatar.
     
  8. B1105

    B1105 New Member

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    Tanner will respond, he knows everything related to metal.
     
  9. Tanner

    Tanner New Member

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    Let me check my chart. The only weldable aluminum alloys are: 1100, 3003, 3105, 5005, 5052, 5086, 6061, 7075. 2024 is NOT weldable. Only 3105, 2024, 6061 and 7075 are heattreatable. after the alloy 6061-0 (dead soft state) is heattreated, it becomes 6061-T4 (solution treated) or 6061-T6 (Oven heat treated). Also, Mr Floyd is right. If you weld a part AFTER it has been heattreated, you'll probably lose your temper. Ba-dum-ksssh. No, you'll lose the heat treating. So, to make sure you have a good n' strong frame, weld it first, then heat treat. I should probably also add, that, use 100% argon and a nice AC tig welder. You'll like the appearence of the weld a lot more
     
  10. ross128

    ross128 Guest

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    well, its not kinda up to me, the aluminium i want to use is 6063 t5 temper and 6063 t6 temper(practically the same material, but a different temper as i understand), if it is tempered already, how can i get it heat treated? and tanner, can those two alumiiums be welded to eachother?
     
  11. Tanner

    Tanner New Member

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    Yep, you can weld those together. To re heat treat it, throw it in an oven. Really.