Wedge Balance

Discussion in 'Observed Trials Discussion' started by Stock, Jun 26, 2004.

  1. Stock

    Stock Tumescent.

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    Hey is there some trick to balancing in a wedge situation or is it just a matter of practice? I tried wedging between two railroad tracks but I can't seem to correct.... I just fall to the side. Does turning the bars one way or another help... or is it just like learning to trackstand all over again?
     
  2. Ryden

    Ryden Guest

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    Try some stationary hops. I find it hard to do them for long, but just do a couple then go for it.
     

  3. felix

    felix New Member

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    Put one pedal down, so that the cranks are vertical. By doing this your center of gravity is lowered.
     
  4. Paulsf

    Paulsf New Member

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    as far as bike setup goes, i find that a larger front tire and rim makes you more stable in wedges.
     
  5. Cryo-Cube

    Cryo-Cube -----------

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    im practicing wedges too. Turning the bars a bit to keep in balance helps. If you´re almost falling to a side you can put your bad foot from the pedal and balance with your bad leg
    Or you go more down and use your ass & knees to balance like this

    [​IMG]
     
  6. xxxfr

    xxxfr RCP FABRICATION

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    one of the hardest tricks ive ever done was a wedge on a rail road track. i started parallel to the tracks in the middle, 90 deg hop to a wedge, and i lost my balence 10,000 times until i kept my weight more back, than centered, then after u get ur balence, pull to ur rear wheel and pedalkick to the other track. i just recently stuck this move, took almost a month.....
     
  7. OTAdmin

    OTAdmin Administrator Staff Member

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    You can't really turn your tires much in a wedge, especially if you're brakeless on the front wheel like you normally will be. You have to remain pretty much centered over the frame, but if you keep your bars straight you can push to the side on the bars without turning them to counteract your falling feeling. It's hard and takes practice, I still suck at it :)

    Bill
     
  8. AndyT

    AndyT New Member

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    Just practice it all the time, like any other move in trials...when you are good you should not be doing any hoping, any turning of the wheel. Only releasing the brakes/balancing. Use your knees to balance- this is one of a number of reasons why a UCI frames don't have a 15" high seat tube, so your knees have clearance in such situations.
     
  9. pav

    pav New Member

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    you may find it helps if you find a rock or something that has a dip in it where you can stick the front wheel in
    or learn on virtical walls, on these i find it easier when you have the front higher to stand up straight and when fornt is lower to lean back more
    as for brakes i would say that it is personal preferance but what i have found that is easy and works for me is i fall into the wedge with both brakes locked and then get some balance then apply alot of pressure to front pedal then release back brake, its makes it easier to twist and turn with the back brake off

    hope this helps

    pav
     
  10. Spacemunkee

    Spacemunkee Guest

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    i learnt against a old shed door which has a little bit of bounce in it which helps to grip your tyre at first. I found also that its easier (for me anyway) instead of hopping to put my wheel on to kick the pedals so my i roll my back wheel forward and my front lifts to wedge the wall.. it looks alot smoother and somehow i keep my balance better and tend to not want to hop to regain balance if im really in trouble.. as soon as i have my basic side to side balance i let go of my front and then the back brake. It really is all about practice although to get the basic idea you will probably only need a 30 minute to a hour session for a few days
     
  11. Little Android Man

    Little Android Man Free Cup!

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    i have a couple questions..when your wheels are spanning something..like a train track, but your not really in between anything is it still a wedge?

    second question-when practicing wedges on a wall, is it more beneficial to stand straight up or lean back. i find it easier if im standing way over the front but does it erally help that much?
     
  12. Stock

    Stock Tumescent.

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    My WB is 1030, for me it's a wedge :)
     
  13. WhiteRavenKS

    WhiteRavenKS Well-Known Member

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    i wonder if there is a video out there about wedge balance? i bet it would be real stupid and most loud-mouthed idiots would hate it and say it was a waste and stuff... only a few people would appreciate it i bet. ;)
     
  14. Little Android Man

    Little Android Man Free Cup!

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    haah i have your video and i watch it but i cant do alot of the stuff in it. thats why im asking..i cant really hold myself up with chain tension yet (i havent tried recently though) and when i am up I dont know whether is hould be leaning forward or back or what. ive tried going up and down in the past and i can move like 8 inches. oh well. ill watch the video again and go try some more.

    and thorshammer-im on a mod, and just barely reach across...im just wondering if thats still a wedge is all
     
  15. WhiteRavenKS

    WhiteRavenKS Well-Known Member

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    the farther down your front wheel goes on the front face of an object the farther back you need to have your weight. your ass should counter weight the location of the front wheel.
     
  16. Andreas

    Andreas All About Trials

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    I too, have watched this wedge balance video kevin made. It's great, real great, but the problem for me is - i suck so much that i can't even balance more than 3 seconds when I'm up on the wall. The video is good for people who can already balance decently but me...I'm just looking for tips in general for wedge balance. I guess the main thing is to keep practicing.
    In the next few days i'll try and spend more time on it then i have been. i can get wedges OK on flat ground in between objects, but not on a wall...hmmm
     
  17. Stock

    Stock Tumescent.

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    There is, but the link is dead :wtc:
     
  18. RomanR

    RomanR DualDisc 26"

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    I watched Kevin's video when it came out like 10 times in a row, a couple of days later when the snow finally cleared enough i took my bike out for the first ride. Everything worth riding was still under snow, except for a wall nearby, so I decided to learn wedges. My first couple of attempts I did with both brakes locked, but fell to the side right away as soon as my front tire touched.

    Then I remembered Kevin's vid, and said hey why not try it with no front brake. This time i stayed on the wall for a couple of seconds, and right when I felt I was tipping over, something made me turn my bars a little bit, and I got right back to the balance point. So that made it for me, figuring out that by turning the bars a little bit in the direction I'm falling will stop me and bring me back the other way. Next few attempts I stayed on longer and longer, until I could do them until my arms got too pumped from holding the wedge.

    Then I tried to let off my rear brake after going into a wedge, and put tension on the chain. First attempt, slam the front wheel right down. Not enough tension, but I got it in the next couple of attempts, and started going up and down the wall just like Kevin in his vid. Next I tried them switch foot, and on corners, and got all of them down. In 20 mins i learned to do the wedges that Kevin showed in his vid. For me, they just clicked.

    In the next rides after that, I kept doing them on walls, and started learning them on objects where I would kick up them after balancing a bit. It was harder to do wedges on actual objects instead of walls, pretty much because the only stuff I could kick up after a wedge were low objects so balancing on them was harder without moving the front wheel around.

    So, some tips that could help you learn them on walls, are to get the front wheel on the wall without hopping, just by doing a pedal kick without hopping. This will help you keep your balance more in control. Also, try to learn them without a front brake since it will be easier to balance them at first. For me it was anyway. Turn your bars a bit if you feel you're going to fall. Turn them your front wheel in the direction you're falling, and use your knees and butt to get your balance back. Try balancing with your hips close to the bar, then with your butt far back, to see how the balance sort of changes. Then try to ratchet your cranks around, going to switch foot, then back to good foot, etc. For brakeless ones, put tension on your front foot and lean back a bit, get your balance centered, then let off the rear brake and keep tension on your front foot. Turning the front wheel will let you balance yourself. And most of all, practice them a lot. You can do them anywhere, in your garage against something, your driveway against your house, against a handrail, tree, anything. You might learn them very quickly like me, or it might take you longer to get the move down. Practice it lots to get really comfortable doing them, then tie it into lines and moves.