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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This isnt especially trials related so ill put it here..
the bigger the rotor the more stopping power right? meaning an 8" rotor will stop better than a 6"..because of leverage. Or is the size just for cooling? I see on some sites it says the 8" has 15% more stopping power but once again, is it due to leverage?
Thanks..
 

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On a trials bike especially, it is the extra leverage. On a DH bike, it would probably cool a bit faster, but wouldn't really be noticeable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
well i know that the cooling does not come in to play for trials, but an 8 inch rotor is going to stop you faster than a 6 inch, due to leverage, correct?
 

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I suggest you look up definition of torque in any physics text book :) Essentially you can think of the rotor as a lever that is trying to stop the hub from spinning. The longer the lever the better the results.
 

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it's like this-vee brakes are weak because they have to stop the whole wheel. therefor, you could infer that you would wanta small disc, however, the disc is so small that for ever time the wheel makes one full rotation the rotor pads don't have enough time to stop the rotor. therefor you could infer that you want something in between 26 in wheels and around 3 inch rotors. so 8 is better than 6 because the 8 is larger than the 6 but not too big
 

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BiKe4EvEr said:
it's like this-vee brakes are weak because they have to stop the whole wheel. therefor, you could infer that you would wanta small disc, however, the disc is so small that for ever time the wheel makes one full rotation the rotor pads don't have enough time to stop the rotor. therefor you could infer that you want something in between 26 in wheels and around 3 inch rotors. so 8 is better than 6 because the 8 is larger than the 6 but not too big
haahahahahahahaha

...you weren't being serious... were you?
 

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I suggest you look up definition of torque in any physics text book Essentially you can think of the rotor as a lever that is trying to stop the hub from spinning. The longer the lever the better the results.
Um...that still makes no sense. The rotor can get as big as the entire wheel. By itself, that still wont make the bike slow down any better. :slap:
 

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im no scientist, but some dumb shit is in this thread.



8" rotor works better than 6" rotor, with the same caliper.
 

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silus2000 said:
I suggest you look up definition of torque in any physics text book Essentially you can think of the rotor as a lever that is trying to stop the hub from spinning. The longer the lever the better the results.
Um...that still makes no sense. The rotor can get as big as the entire wheel. By itself, that still wont make the bike slow down any better. :slap:
If that doesn't make any sense, than maybe you need to repeat grade 6. A larger rotor doesn't have any more pad contact area than the smaller one. the contact area can only be as big as the pad. It really is quite simple. It is the extra leverage that makes it stop better. Once again it goes to the torque explanation.
 

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A larger rotor doesn't have any more pad contact area than the smaller one. the contact area can only be as big as the pad. It really is quite simple.
My words...
The rotor can get as big as the entire wheel. By itself, that still wont make the bike slow down any better.
I'm still trying to figure out what you were trying to say after basically repeating the same point I had just made. I appreciate your input, though. :rolleyes:
 

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Definitely getting good here.

I've been resisting a very long ramble including friction coefficients, torque values, clamping forces, and other goodies.

Think I'll keep on resisting.
 

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silus2000 said:
A larger rotor doesn't have any more pad contact area than the smaller one. the contact area can only be as big as the pad. It really is quite simple.
My words...
The rotor can get as big as the entire wheel. By itself, that still wont make the bike slow down any better.
I'm still trying to figure out what you were trying to say after basically repeating the same point I had just made. I appreciate your input, though. :rolleyes:
Making the rotor bigger will slow down the wheel faster. How is this so hard to understand?
 
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