newbie questions

Discussion in 'Beginner's Area' started by steve_v, Sep 29, 2004.

  1. steve_v

    steve_v New Member

    95
    2
    0
    I'm new to trials but have been riding mountain bikes for a long time. I'm looking at a frame with the following geometry : 1065 mm wheelbase, 390 mm. chainstays, and a 71 degree head angle. I'm 6' tall, if that helps. Would this be a good starter frame (I can get it cheap !) What stem length would be best ?.

    Also, I have an XT disc/Rhyno lite wheelset and I was going to use Avid mech. disc brakes. I see that a lot of riders use disc up front and hydraulic rim in the rear. Why ? I really don't want to mess with hydros at this point and I like the avids.

    Lastly, are the Truvativ trials cranks any good (the cheaper ones). Thanks
     
  2. OTAdmin

    OTAdmin Administrator Staff Member

    2,984
    105
    63
    I would say that this frame size is just right for someone 6' tall. I am 6'3" and my 1065 is just a hair too small, my next frame will be around 1080 or so.

    I'm guessing you're planning on using disc brakes front and rear. The problem we have run into with disc brakes on the rear is that the disc tabs have a habit of ripping off. There are only a couple frames out there that can hold up to the use of a rear disc and not break. The Brisa (check it out here) has a pretty unique rear disc mount between the chainstay and seat stay that is tried and trued with trials. The Megamo also seems to hold up to disc use, but its quite a bit more rare and I'm not sure where to find pictures.

    As for what discs to use, there is nothing wrong with the avids, but the avid mechanical will not fit on the disc mount on the back of a brisa. Peyto makes a frame with a chainstay disc mount that will work with an avid mechanical.

    The reason why we use discs up front is pretty simple; they have incredible power for great lock up strength, and they modulate for front wheel moves. They also work consistently, in almost all weather. We use rim brakes on the rear because trials frames and possibly disc brakes themselves aren't quite ready for rear use. The reason the hydraulic rim brakes are used on the rear is because its basically industry standard. A lot of frames come with 4 bolt mounts for the rear and since there isn't a good 4 bolt to v-brake adapter available currently, most just run hydraulic rim brakes. Some people have made custom brake conversion mounts for themselves, but as far as I know, nothing is publically available yet.

    There is nothing wrong with running a v-brake in the rear. Personally I think they have more power than a stock magura hs-33, so if you're getting a frame with v-brake mounts and you already have a set of v-brakes or want to save money - just use v-brakes. The trials pad selection for v-brakes isn't as large as it is for hs-33s, but plazmatic makes some nice v-brake pads which should be all you ever need anyhow :).

    I've never used the cheap truvativ hussefelt cranks, but I must admit I have heard more bad than good about them. I can't make a recommendation for cheap cranks because I'm just not sure whats out there right now. I can say that if you're willing for spend another $100, you can get some bonz cranks that are just incredible :). Call them up and ask for a price shipped to the U.S... I think they'll do better than what it says on their website, or at least they did when I ordered mine (almost two years ago now).

    Lastly, welcome to the site. If you have any more questions, just ask.

    Bill
     

  3. Blackstick

    Blackstick Well-Known Member

    2,089
    244
    63
    Yep, what Bill said. Just keep asking and reading, its the only way to learn.
     
  4. steve_v

    steve_v New Member

    95
    2
    0
    Thanks, I appreciate the advice. Trials are the coolest thing I have ever seen. I'm psyched to be getting a trials bike, I don't think my mtb can take much more. Glad my wife is patient, this is bike #5.

    Here's another question. How are "street" trials bikes different from "regular" trials bikes. I live in the boonies in upstate NY so most of my riding is done in the woods - big rocks and other natural obstacles (cows, rednecks). Does the geometry I listed above seem o.k. I don't plan on doing any jumping on this bike. I jump great but the landings - not so good. Thanks
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2004
  5. Elan

    Elan steve french

    9,733
    109
    63
    yea, 1065 is a good base WB for natural riding. on street most people opt for shorter wheelbases like 1040 or somthing. i ride a levelboss 1065, it is awesome for everything pretty much.
     
  6. String Theorist

    String Theorist Guest

    1
    0
    0
    I would say that street bikes are generally shorter. This helps the rider flick it around and do more streety moves, like spins.

    I would say that the geometry you listed sounds great for your size and type of riding.
     
  7. Blackstick

    Blackstick Well-Known Member

    2,089
    244
    63
    And definately keep up the natural riding, someone said once, "ride natural and you'll be a natural rider".

    I would also like to see a video of "gap cow to redneck" too!.
     
  8. steve_v

    steve_v New Member

    95
    2
    0
    I do a lot of mountain biking, the northeast has amazing technical trails. You read my mind about the cow pic, I'll make it my avatar. I learned how to trackstand and pivot on a 30+ pound FS bike with a slacker head angle so I'm hoping a trials bike will help to move me along to cooler moves.