Just gotta ask.

Discussion in 'Observed Trials Discussion' started by Dab not, Jul 28, 2004.

  1. Dab not

    Dab not New Member

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    Newbie [old] guy here.

    I saw a trials demo at Whistler B.C. last week and was amazed. Knowing of both moto and bicycle trials, I even had a TL250 for a short while when I was young[er], yet I never pursued it on a bicycle [again, yet]. So I started doing reseach on hardware this week.

    I have a MTB (old Klein Rascal) and have given thought to converting it for a "stocker". I've considered starting with a BMX, with a few mods, (cheap and plentiful and my 6YO son would have another bike to play on). I've considered getting a used mod bike.

    An odd question just occured to me however. Why aren't "cruiser" size bikes used for trails? Obviously there's the mod camp (20") and the stock camp (26") but wouldn't a 24" sized frame and tire be [almost] the best of both camps?

    Great forum!
     
  2. Andreas

    Andreas All About Trials

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    1-Converting a mtb into a stock is a great way to start. Lower your seat, take off your clipless pedals (if you have them, then get platforms), and you should be OK to learn. Make sure your brakes can lock up well!
    2-Getting a BMX then converting it will not work. It's an idea that has been tried. The geo. of a BMX is completely different than that of a Mod bike. You will be better off picking up an X Alp from webcyclery for a mear 350 US dollars, as opposed to spending just that much alone to get the BMX bike half decent.
    3-People do use 24" sometimes. However, I'm not sure if they're allowed in competitions, becuase they don't fit into a mod class or a stock class. For this reason I think they're not used often. People that do use them only ride street (I think Asthon makes a 24" wheeled bike). Also, I think the advantages of each bike are best shown with the vast difference in size. 20" wheeled bikes will be more flickable, more standover, less weight, and are easier to learn on. 26" wheeled bikes can roll stuff better, can go bigger, and can be equally as light as a mod bike, if you are a weight weenie. However, i think that having a 24" bike doesn't really bring out to goods from those areas. It's going to be as heavy as a stock, the standover won't be superb, and the wheels are going to be a bit hard to roll compared to stock. So I think that 20" or 26" is the way to go, no inbetweens.
     

  3. Dab not

    Dab not New Member

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    All good points Andreas. Thanks.

    As I've read elsewhere in this forum, 9 out of 10 trials riders start out on something non-trials specific. At the demo at Whistler some guy came out of the crowd with a modified road bike to do some pretty advanced moves.

    I don't think I'd ever compete so having a "competitive" ride will probably not be in my future if I stick with it.

    If I go with some mods to my MTB I'd like to have a single cog on the rear, just to simplify things.
     
  4. Little Android Man

    Little Android Man Free Cup!

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    regarding the 24" bike-ashton does make a 24", the Edd Tongue, and i think it is more of a street style frame. i believe that riding 24inch is allowed in competitions in the mod class, depending on how strict the rles are. (could be like one of those "open" classes..) i think the only real advantage would be noticed if you were really short and didnt want to ride mod.

    but i agree, riding something like an XC frame with a dropped/removed seat and very good brakes will get you through until you really decide you want to ride a trials specific bike. especially if you learn the basic fundamentals on it, because once you finally get that trials bike your skills will just improve dramatically, in a much shorter time than before. youll really feel the difference, youll be able to move around on it and just use it more to your advantage than before, its just a really good transition.

    and the bmx idea...definitely just go for a trials specific something instead, theres such a difference between it and say a cheap mod bike. they may look the same, but its like night and dday riding the two.

    i hope i made sense/helped out at all
     
  5. RT Wolf

    RT Wolf Insanity Studios Inc.

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    You can make many changes to a regular mtb to convert it into a more trialsy bike. However, the geo of a trials-specifc frame cannot be beat. Just start up and see how you like it. I learned to pedalkick on a the largest size completely stock 2003 Hardrock Specialized, so it's possible to learn trials on a non-trials-specific bike, or at least to figure out whether you wanna put down the cashmoney for a trials-specific bike.

    I've heard of many people putting down hundreds to change their regular mtb over to a more trials bike only to end up buying a new frame/bike later. I'd rather keep that money for a new bike, hopefully making it a better one, but it's your choice, especially if you just have some parts lying about.

    And as far as not competing is concerned, you can also just have a very trialsy hardtail, get a nice street/trials frame, such as the Norco Moment, slap a bit of suspension on, and you're set for trialsing when you want and urban riding when you want. Ryan Leech's bike is set up like that. So you don't have to have hardcore trials bike that tops out at 15 mph.

    Or something. Hope this helps.
     
  6. klophaus

    klophaus Guest

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    If you do go the way of converting your XC bike for trials. The following things I found helped the most:

    Wide bars (28-29")

    A bit shorter or higher rise stem (around 90-110mm and 5-15 deg rise is nice depending on the frame and you).

    Brakes: move your levers in so you get the most leverage possible with 1 finger. Most XC riders have it so you're hitting other fingers with the lever if you try to brake with 1 finger. If you can't lock you're brakes up with 1 finger you need to set set your brakes up differently.

    The flat pedals already mentioned and dropping the seat as already mentioned.

    Have fun and stick with it.
     
  7. Dab not

    Dab not New Member

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    Thanks for all the great posts. I'd really like to find a mod frame to build on, or a solid used beginner mod bike. But I've also given more thought to turning my Klein into a single speed. Any thoughts on a cost effective setup?

    I know some of my questions are probably redundant with other posts, so thanks for not spraying all over my newbie dumbness.
     
  8. oicdn

    oicdn Guest

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    And that's the point many fail to realize. Even if cash is poured slowly onto an existing bike to make it more trialsy, why didn you just save the money and have TWO bike, each geared for thier own purpose. Nothing sucks more than a bike that CAN do everything, But sucks comparitively to bikes in a specific niche.

    Just hold out, and get a REAL trials bike. If you find out you end up liking it, atleast it wasn't from a sour taste of shoddy equipment pieced together......
     
  9. Little Android Man

    Little Android Man Free Cup!

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    if your still looking for a mod frame in about a month, ill probably have one. im getting a python but they wont be in the US until mid august or later, and once i get it i will probably sell my monty frame. it might be easier just to get the whole thing though, i dunno.

    but whatever you choose just remember to have fun with what your doing. thats probably the most important thing
     
  10. Dab not

    Dab not New Member

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    LAM,
    PM me about your frame!
     
  11. Dab not

    Dab not New Member

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