Futility of talking yourself into doing it

Discussion in 'Observed Trials Discussion' started by DaneBrammage, Sep 7, 2004.

  1. DaneBrammage

    DaneBrammage Guest

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    I noticed really strongly yesterday how futile it is to keep telling myself and telling myself whats important to remember about doing a move while I'm trying to do it. I dont know if many of you do that.. you keep thinking that if you phrase the self instruction a certain way it will be like a secret password and then you'll OWN the move forever and ever.

    I was trying to settle down and be emotionless while learning to lurch around in small increments, like around a foot at a time (thanks for the motivation Bloodhound!) Well I was sometimes doing it and sometimes not. And then the inner talking began, and after every scrubbed attempt I'd remind myself what to remember. And so on and so on. Sometimes I'd cook up a new formula in my head to allow me to do it. Nothing ever worked for very long.

    I mention all of this because the answer is all about sublimating the process-- and NOT about throwing more words of 'inspiration & hope' at the situation. Like was said about Andrew looking cool calm and collected in a pic on another thread, and Kevin saying emotion is for suckers.. really, it seems that putting the entire operation as far away out of reach of words is the best way to approach making a move your own. Theres a vast difference between talking yourself into pulling off a move once out of ten attempts, and really owning it. And you cant own a move by using words. Or emotions either I suppose. I dont think nervous energy plays a very big part in high-end trials.

    Anyway, those are some thoughts to sublimate and then throw away. As is proper.
     
    1 person likes this.
  2. Rob.K

    Rob.K Guest

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    quieting you're mind is a very important skill in a lot of sports. The people that do this well appear to have more confidence and trust in themselves. This is because they let their body go and do the work, not their minds.

    Repitition in trials is key so that you're body can do the work properly without the mind comming in and disturbing things.

    this is a good topic and I am shure others can further elaborate.
     

  3. MikeTheBike

    MikeTheBike Active Member

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    Oh, I agree completely. Our brains are just too slow. Until the move becomes instinctual, you will never "own" it, as it were. Developing those instincts takes time.
     
  4. zebdidude

    zebdidude Guest

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    I am going to have to disagree....kinda. When you are learning a new move from scratch then I would say you have to think more about what you are doing. At the beginning, you haven't trained your brain or muscles to do the new move so talking your way through it helps....for me anyways. But I do agree in the sense that once the move is learned, yes, clear the mind and just let your body flow. Also, when you know you can do a move or a line and the mind starts chattering, a dangerous emotions reveals itself.....inhibition!

    Great Topic!
     
  5. antidis

    antidis Guest

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    This seems much to deep a topic for this forum, however i hope it will be admissable by the lot of you to enlist my intelectual forte'. Venturing into the depths of a trials rider's mind can be as dangerous as the moves we try so hard to supress. And it seems that although presence of mind is a key atribute to knowing where to begin and where to end, it is merely a nuisance when the developement of any feature is in its adolescence.
     
  6. bwagner

    bwagner New Member

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    :werd: Yeah, what he said
     
  7. AndyT

    AndyT New Member

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    Ok this is going to sound wierd- but i have NO FUCKING CLUE what is going on when I'm riding.


    I might as well have my eyes closed, I can never remember through eyes what I just did- like my eyes are open but I see nothing. It's all instincts and through practice, when I am doing a big up for example I don't try to do anything it just happens.

    Once you finally stop thinking about what to do and just do it (TM) you are set. Some people make faces and stuff, I guess I'm not that kind of person.
     
  8. bwagner

    bwagner New Member

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    OPEN YOUR EYES MAAAANNNNNN

    Andrew,
    A fun experiment is to do the exact opposite for a change. While trying to learm 360's on my BMx about fifteen years ago, I decided to make myself watch what was going on. I was discussing it with a friend, and we came to the conclusion that we both kinda blacked out while spinning. We thought that our eyes were closed, but actually we were just in a wierd state of mind, so we consciously made ourselves look while trying to spin them. It was fun as hell, I've never had so many crashes in a row in my life, but it was still fun. You have a completely new perspective when actually watching things happen. Try it sometime, I'm sure you'll get a kick out of it.
     
  9. AgrAde

    AgrAde From your head to your fists

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    i'm the same as andrew - if you asked me how far away i am from a wall when i aim up a pedalup, or how far away i am when i take off i wouldn't have a clue. if i'm doing a surge sideways and forwards where i need to rotate around and drop my front wheel in the air then all i think about is jumping in that direction and putting my wheels where i wanted them to go. i couldn't tell you what happens, and if i wanted to explain it to a newbie then i'd have to go out and do it about 5 times to see what i actually do.

    when i'm learning a move it's similar - i don't think about what i'm doing while im actually doing the move. i'll watch a video and repeat the motions in my chair or standing up or something in time to the video. then when i go out and try it i'll use the timing and technique i learned as well as i can.

    because i don't actually know what i'm doing in my move it's hard to say what i'm doing wrong if i can't get it for some reason. which is why someone to ride with is infinitely handy, even if they're not as good as you they can still compare you to what they have seen in videos.

    i find having my mouth open like a retard helps on natural :rofl:
     
  10. Cryo-Cube

    Cryo-Cube -----------

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    mouth open? wtf i´ve never seen ANYONE do a single move with their mouth open, ithought it was impossible like sneezing with open eyes.
     
  11. Elan

    Elan steve french

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    the best way to ride is not to think aboot anything...blank mind. make sure you are breathing correctly, thats about it. works for me anyways...
     
  12. Bloodhound

    Bloodhound Steffen L.T.

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    That was most unexpected..?

    I know exactly what you mean though. Kinda devoloping a formula in your mind for how to do a move. I do this when learing new tricks on my skate, it works very well for me. Trials is totally different, I dont even see 'tricks' or 'moves' or 'techniques'. Its all just ridding, I dont believe in the 'the less you think the better' concept, there is definately thought in my ridding, but more about what I'm doing as opposed to how to do it. (If that makes any sense) Interesting topic.
     
  13. hophopsnap

    hophopsnap Well-Known Member

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    I laugh when I do something simple or stupid. I guess I bear my teeth when I do something hard or whatever.. I donno, just seems like Andrew's face is on another body that is riding a train or something, and his body is riding the trials..doesnt make sense but oh well. :blah:
     
  14. AndyT

    AndyT New Member

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    You should see it when I unload ... :naughty:
     
  15. Andreas

    Andreas All About Trials

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    werd. i always knew that i never thought exactly what i do (just do it, think stupid) but i just now realized that i never REALLY remember what i just did. i don't remember seeing my feet move, my body crunch, and my rear wheel stick to that up or whatever.

    THINK STUPID is the best advice i could give
     
  16. Elan

    Elan steve french

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  17. chronic

    chronic Dungeonmaster's Guide

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    I think too much when I ride, which could be a flaw, but maybe not. I am too analytical to just, do anything with out pondering for a moment. I usualy inspect the upcoming line, convince my self I can do it by performing the motions I believe to be necessary. And continue this until I complete the line.
    But usualy, I get irritated if I try something over and over, then I leave it for another day. I often will only try a line once and if I do not get it, I wait until another ride. And then, I usualy get it my second time when I am calm and confident.
     
  18. hophopsnap

    hophopsnap Well-Known Member

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    video? :ugh:
     
  19. AndyT

    AndyT New Member

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    Stupid people are generally the most talented at sports- now this might not be because they are actually stupid, but they spend more time doing the sport as opposed to learning.
     
  20. OTAdmin

    OTAdmin Administrator Staff Member

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    Is it then possible that I'm the smartest person on this board? Cause I suck at trials.