Easter Pictures

Discussion in 'Your Bike Trials Media' started by alexm, Apr 11, 2004.

  1. alexm

    alexm Member

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    [​IMG]
    Harley Wu

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    Harley Wu

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    Harley Wu

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    Harley Wu resting

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    Nick Baxter

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    Mitch Ho

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    Mitch Ho dabbing, just thought it looked cool.


    I am really starting to becoming interested in this whole still photography thing however i dont know anything about anything when it comes to taking pics. These are all purely automatic focus and the rest of it. I took a lot of pics and these are pretty much the best. I want to get into more manually contolled pictures but as i said before i know nothing.

    Feel free to give me any tips, im just using my Dads Olympus C-700 digital camera. It is pretty old now but i dont think i will upgrade just yet.

    Also pick on the pictures as much as you like, but if you do, can you please tell me how i could improve them. To keep this biketrials media related, there are more pictures on http://www.canberratrials.com

    Thanks alot

    Alex
     
  2. PaulG

    PaulG Releasing the Kitties

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    hey nice pics man. i got into photography about a year ago from just taking trials pics now migrated to pretty much everything but trials is still the focus i still suck but hey it's fun. i would recommend checking ut www.fredmiranda.com and maybe submitting some pics for some critique so far thats my fav photography site. for now i'd say keep shooting don't be afraid to get in close and experiment with angles the beauty of digital is you can go nuts with experimentation and know immediatly if it worked.
     

  3. OTAdmin

    OTAdmin Administrator Staff Member

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    Alex, those pictures are really great... especially if this is your first time giving it a real effort. I really like picture two, crazy australian background, only thing for that one is that the horizon is tilted, so you can either rotate it a bit in photoshop or make sure your camera is level next time. You can always talk to me on MSN about it.

    Bill
     
  4. Elan

    Elan steve french

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    OH NOESSS!! THE WORLD IS GOING SIDEWAYZZZ!!!
     
  5. alexm

    alexm Member

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    Ok, i could look this up on the net no doubt but i was wondering what are good settings to use when taking pics. like a standard aperture setting for a nice sunny day, things like that. Just settings that i can use on the camera and fiddle with to get a really nice shot when the weather isnt quite perfect or whatever.

    My action shots, say if someone is gapping are often blurry, how can i fix that? ive seen some cools pics on the site Paul G reccomended. this bmxer is in focus but the background is blurry, my pictures would turn out the other way around. do i just have to move the camera with the action?

    Also Bill, i read in another post, someone commented on how your pictures look a little 'hard'. i like it, but how do you do it?

    Alex

    PS - that second picture, after looking at it for a while. im pretty sure that i took the picture horizontally. i think its all hills.
     
  6. OTAdmin

    OTAdmin Administrator Staff Member

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    Well, there is no good standard setting for a certain type of photo, it will vary from scene to scene.

    For standard sports shots I would say crank the aperture down (numerically) as far as you can. This will open the lens up as big as possible to let the most amount of light in in the shortest period. That means you can use a faster shutter speed to stop the action and still have bright pictures. The only downside to a large aperture (small numerically) is that your depth of field, or how much of the picture is in focus, decreases as you increase your aperture (decrease numerically). Two other factors will play into this; how close you are to your subject (the closer you are to what you are focusing on, the smaller the depth of field), and your focal length (the more you zoom in, the smaller the depth of field will be). So If you're cranking your aperture way down, just be sure that you're focusing on what you want in focus and not on some other object in the picture.

    You can also play with your iso speed. Every time you double this number, you can double your shutter speed (like from 1/60s to 1/120s). This is because the sensor that captures the image (like film does in a film camera) is increasing its sensitivity to incoming light as you increase the ISO speed. Because your sensor will be more sensitive to incoming light there will be more "noise" in the images, so only increase the iso as a last resort.

    As for my standard post processing procedure, I bring it into PS, decrease the image to whatever size I'm going to display it at (largest side 640). I will then adjust levels if necessary (lately I find this is almost pointless as I'm nailing exposure almost every time) If this is a picture I am particularly proud of or may want to frame I will use curves instead of levels, but getting curves right takes experience, some people can do it in seconds, others it will take minutes. Then I adjust saturation and contrast. I then follow it up with some unsharp mask, 150% with a radius of .5 is a good starting point. I RARELY sharpen more, but I often sharpen less (like 110% radius .5). I've turned off all sharpening, saturation and contrast in my camera though, so depending upon how much your camera is doing these things for you, you may or may not want to mess with these.

    Of course, if your camera has a sports mode, you can just stick it in there and it will likely use the smallest possible aperture and a bit higher ISO and meter the scene for you. This is a good way to stop the action.

    Bill
     
  7. warpig

    warpig Guest

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    Finding a aperature/shutter speed tutorial will definitley help as those are the basics to understanding what a camera lens does. For you however, not knowing what kind of camera you're using here's a quick cash course overview.

    If you can adjust/set your shutter speed to 250th/sec or faster, do it and let the camera control the aperature. I start at 250th/sec which will freeze the rider but sometimes leaves the spokes and tire tread a little blurred which helps give the perspective/sense of motion. If you're using a digi cam with subject settings you'll find a sports setting in there somewhere. That's all my little Sony digi cam has and it keeps the shutter speeds in the 250-1000th/sec range.

    With fast shutter speeds though you're going to get wide aperatures (narrow depth of field) so don't be surprised if only the handlebars and riders face is the only thing in focus.

    That should get you started without knowing what kind of camera you're using..................... Though I just thought of one other setting on digi cams. ISO setting. If it has that, take it off auto and see what you get in the 400+ISO range. On a bright sunny day 100ISO will work but with a narrow depth of field (aperature wide open). You'll start to see grain at 400 but not much as long you're not out to make 8X10's for your friends.

    As far as the blurred backgrounds with sharp rider images, that's where you get into panning with slow shutter speeds (1/15th/sec and as long as 1 sec). Then put yourself in a skatepark and flash is needed along with a camera that handles rear curtain sync. But that's a different lesson....................

    edit - and I was just sitting here thinking "I wonder if Bill will get to this before I press Submit" :D
     
  8. G-Jordan

    G-Jordan Guest

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    they are some really nice pics there, i really like the first three, they show a lot of character and movement i think. Well done

    george