HOW-TO vid series on YouTube (TORAYA/GOLDRUSH)

Discussion in 'Beginner's Area' started by ProfPoopyPants, Sep 26, 2017.

  1. ProfPoopyPants

    ProfPoopyPants New Member

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    There is depressing lack of in-depth, clear trials tutorials on YouTube(*).

    The guys behind the main trials shops in Japan (TORAYA/GOLDRUSH) have an awesome series of trials how-to videos. Their explanations are deep and provide great advice of what TO DO as well as what NOT TO DO, but since the content isn't in English, we English-speakers haven't been able to benefit from their content.

    I translated and made English subtitles for their first video on trackstanding (there are 3 on just that topic). I'd like to know if you guys think the content is helpful and whether you'd like me to translate more of the vids.

    I'm all about going back to basics. Everyone can improve by focusing more on core skills. I hope if this is helpful. If you've got questions, lemme know.

    * TrashZen is great, but I'd argue that it could be more comprehensive.

    If you don't see the subtitles, click the [CC] icon in the bottom right corner of the video player.

    Standing, Part 1


    Standing, Part 2


    Standing, Part 3


    PUSH!


    Front Roll-Up
    (the subtitles for this one are accidentally listed as "Japanese" rather than English, but if you select it, they will display properly in English. I've already let the guy know, and he'll probably fix it later.)
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2017
    spaceguy and wonnabe like this.
  2. kiwin00b

    kiwin00b New Member

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    I've just registered on here to say a huge thank you for this. Like you say most resources aren't nearly in depth enough to let you know where you're going wrong, which is actually more helpful to me than knowing if I'm getting it right.
    I've only just started with a trials bike to try rehab a broken ankle, and honestly I still can't get my head around the absolute basics. This video was more helpful to me than anything I've seen or read so far, because it points out the things you shouldn't be doing, and how to progressively get better from the ground up.
    Again, thanks for all the hard work you must've put in. Really hope to see some more in the future.
     

  3. dougj

    dougj New Member

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    That was the best vid I've seen to help learn! As a newbie, my trackstand is holding me back and the tops here will help.

    Thanks, I'd love to see more from this source.
     
  4. wonnabe

    wonnabe Member

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    It would be good to see more as I need all the help I can get
     
  5. ProfPoopyPants

    ProfPoopyPants New Member

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    Great feedback, guys. Thanks! The translation is a lot of work, so I appreciate the encouragement.

    I just finished the subtitles for Part 2 of the trackstand series. The link is in the OP of this thread. This video focuses on the hopping/bouncing styles of standing, and includes a lot of advice about common mistakes and what you should be doing instead.

    I'll be working on the final Part 3 of the series in which they talk more about the practice of "finding your center" (no, it's not some yoga concept), and will post again when it's ready. Hope this all helps!
     
  6. wonnabe

    wonnabe Member

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    The link takes me to the vid without the translation?????:dunno:
     
  7. ProfPoopyPants

    ProfPoopyPants New Member

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    Thanks for pointing this out. Yeah, I don't know what's going on. Apparently, around 2015, YouTube disabled the ability to force the display of subtitles via a URL link, and instead leaves it up to the viewer to choose whether or not they want to see subtitles.

    If you don't see the subtitles, click the [CC] icon in the bottom right corner of the YouTube video player, then they should show up :\

    Part 3 is done, and should be uploaded by this weekend, I think.
     
  8. GalesFerry

    GalesFerry New Member

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    This is awesome, thanks professor! The part about bouncing on your front wheel uphill and your back downhill just never crossed my mind. I'm 57 and been riding trials for 3 years so my brain is on the downward slope which may explain it. I'll have to give that a try and see how it goes. More practice for me I love this sport!
     
  9. kiwin00b

    kiwin00b New Member

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    These vids are absolutely awesome, thanks for all the hard work dude
     
  10. werkinit

    werkinit werkinit

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    Great tutorials!!!

    After curb riding, this is one of the most important techniques to work on.

    [ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N00fz9U4pnk[/ame]
     
  11. ProfPoopyPants

    ProfPoopyPants New Member

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    Standing Part 3 subtitles are up. Link is in the OP.
     
  12. Djphelan01

    Djphelan01 Member

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    Thanks for all the work I’m sure it took. You did a great job!
     
  13. ProfPoopyPants

    ProfPoopyPants New Member

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    New subtitles done -- this time for the video on PUSHing. Link is in the OP. This is an older vid from a few years ago, but the concept is often neglected despite its importance.

    PUSHing isn't a trick or move. Think pump track. It's an action that allows you add momentum to moves, and helps you smoothly transition the vector of your movement. If you start a wheelie by pushing down on the handlebars before you pull back on them, you know what I'm talking about. The video appears very street trials -focused, but PUSH is used everywhere in observed trials as well.

    The concept of PUSH is fundamental to hopping the bike forward and over obstacles, the "pedal hopping" that @werkinit linked to, lifting the front wheel, taps, side hops, and a ton of other moves. Hope this helps.
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2017
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  14. ProfPoopyPants

    ProfPoopyPants New Member

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    I need some help!! What would you call these three moves in English? In the near future, I'll be doing the subtitles for these vids, but I have no fucking idea what to call them.

    Vid1:
    [ame]
    In Japan, this is called "Otto Pee", named after Catalan trials legend Ot Pi, who made the move famous. TrashZen calls them "progression hops". Is there some other name for them as well??

    Vid2:
    [ame]
    This is the vid that @werkinit linked to earlier. In Japan, it's called "pedal hop", but of course in English a "pedal hop/kick" is a completely different kind of move. Any ideas?
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2017
  15. 1964Fairlane

    1964Fairlane New Member

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    Thank you for doing this! These videos are great with the translation!
     
  16. ProfPoopyPants

    ProfPoopyPants New Member

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    New video translated. This time, the topic is what I've dubbed a "Front Roll-Up". The Japanese name is completely different, but for the life of me, there doesn't seem to be an established name in English for this move. If you've got any ideas, feel free to let me know. The video link is in the OP.

    While this video's explanation is detailed and helpful, there is actually another Japanese video that visually illustrates the movement (both good and bad examples) even more clearly that the one I translated. It also shows how this move forms the basis of Wheel Swaps. There's no English for the vid, but if you pay close attention to his movements, you can get a good idea of the basic Front Roll-Up form. It's from 2:04 to the end of the video below.



    2:04 - 2:35 common mistakes
    2:35 - 2:55 fundamental body movements without pedaling
    2:59 - 3:25 progressing with the Front Roll-Up movement
    3:27 - 3:32 progression to Wheel Swaps
    3:35 - end showing how Front Roll-Ups can be used on uneven terrain

    (incidentally, this guy's (afro2rin, and afro3rin) tutorials are *extremely* good, but the number is so huge, that I haven't even begun to think about tackling translating any of the material.)
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2017
  17. fineline

    fineline Member

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    Thanks Professor, much appreciated.